#CaregiversInSync

Providing a safety net and springboard of good conscience.

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About CareGiversInSync

Lawful Partners in Good Conscience

Acting in good conscience guides the soul’s journey. When the soul nears the end of life and the medical condition of the patient becomes worse, caregivers are usually called upon to balance faith hope and love with living and dying. This is no easy task for any individual to engage alone. Those dying are often caught in the middle of this tug of war between the minds and hearts of various caregivers. Caregivers include patients themselves, healthcare providers and family members. A shared identity, interaction and integration between these cohorts is essential for any smooth end-of-life journey.

My Image

About CareGiversInSync

Lawful Partners in Good Conscience

Acting in good conscience guides the soul’s journey. When the soul nears the end of life and the medical condition of the patient becomes worse, caregivers are usually called upon to balance faith hope and love with living and dying. This is no easy task for any individual to engage alone. Those dying are often caught in the middle of this tug of war between the minds and hearts of various caregivers. Caregivers include patients themselves, healthcare providers and family members. A shared identity, interaction and integration between these cohorts is essential for any smooth end-of-life journey.

My Image

About CareGiversInSync

Lawful Partners in Good Conscience

There is no choice to not die, yet people are repeatedly offered choices to avert the inevitability of death. Offering options in the face of hopelessly terminal medical conditions usually implies there is merit to this medical intervention, yet can be notoriously inhumane. If there was no established healthcare industry, what obligations would be imposed on patients who are near the end of life? While many patients prefer to die at home, most die in hospitals and skilled-nursing facilities.
Patients near the end of life are ideally aware of their end-stage medical condition and appropriately receive palliative care. When a patient’s medical condition worsens, caregivers need to support one another in upholding the ethical consideration of providing appropriate end-of-life care in lieu of unnecessary medical intervention. Dignity provided to those dying is realized through attaining a good death. A good death is achieved through the collective consensus of certainty and morality that is central to the heart of caregivers and #CaregiversInSync.

The purpose of #CaregiversInSync is to enact a change of heart with regard to the time to die. Aside from wishes, legislation is needed to raise awareness of the unnecessary demands placed on dying patients. Dr. Haselhorst is spearheading the initiative for a new law that would be juxtaposed to the Good Samaritan Law, the Caregiver’s Good Conscience Law. This legislation provides immunity for caregivers who would act in good conscience, averting overzealous life support and administering appropriate end-of-life care. Empowering caregivers to stand down and uphold the dignity of those actively dying remains both a moral responsibility and quagmire. The present medico-legal paradigm supports saving lives rather than sparing the dignity of the patient.

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Our Mission:

Life and death situations require emergency preparedness and caregiver synchronicity.

Laws instill moral codes to society that override personal conflict. Caregivers are the moral matrix of society. The purpose of #CaregiversInSync is to standardize the prospects of providing mercy to patients near the end of life. At present, there are laws to protect unborn children, but few laws that safeguard vulnerable patients as they transition from life. By nature, humanitarians demonstrate good conscience and support dying with dignity as being a good death. A reasonable law needs to raise awareness and encourage caregivers to be collectively humane. #CaregiversInSync serves as a reminder that the Golden Rule applies during life and at the end of life. The Caregiver’s Good Conscience Law is an ever binding means to an end that intends to decree good deaths and respect for humanity.

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Our Mission:

Life and death situations require emergency preparedness and caregiver synchronicity.

Damned if they do and damned if they don’t, caregivers deliberate when to push or pull back, when to offer a hand out or hand up and when to resuscitate or not resuscitate. With a collective mindset to save lives, caregivers are both the moral matrix of society and the adhesive cohort averse to life expiring. Nevertheless, the time to die requires good conscience over oppression and merciful care over intervention in addition to guidelines that empower and protect those willing to provide compassion to those dying. Care partners in sync with good conscience uphold the presence of mind to truly love from the heart during necessary times of letting go.

My Image

Our Mission:

Life and death situations require emergency preparedness and caregiver synchronicity.

Acting in good conscience guides a soul’s journey. When souls detour and lives take a turn for the worse, caregivers are usually called upon to balance faith hope and love with living and dying. This is no easy task for any individual to engage alone. Those dying are often caught in the middle of this tug of war between the minds and hearts of various caregivers. Caregivers include patients themselves, healthcare providers and family members. A shared identity, interaction and integration between these cohorts is essential for any smooth transition in life.
There is no choice to not die, yet people are repeatedly offered choices not to die even while debilitated and receiving palliative care. Offering options aside compassion in the face of hopelessly terminal medical conditions implies merit to this intervention and can be notoriously inhumane. If there was no established healthcare industry, what obligations would be necessary for fulfillment in life? While many patients would prefer to die at home, many actually die in hospitals and skilled-nursing facilities. The necessary evil inherent to living too long typically plays out in extended-care facilities rather than life journeys being privileged to graceful departures. Naturally, the sun setting brilliantly upon the horizon provides the example of how humans might leave this world passively and with splendor.

My Image

Our Mission:

Life and death situations require emergency preparedness and caregiver synchronicity.

Patients near the end of life are ideally aware of their end-stage medical conditions and are supported by necessary palliative care. When a patient’s medical condition worsens, caregivers need to support one another in upholding the ethical consideration of dying with dignity in lieu of receiving unnecessary medical intervention. Dignity provided to those dying bestows mercy, comfort and sanctity through withholding or withdrawing choices for artificial life support. The gift of humanity is ultimately realized in attaining a good death. A good death is achieved through the collective core of consensus, certainty and good conscience found at the heart of “caregivers in sync.”
The purpose of Caregivers In Sync is to enact a change of heart with regard to the time to die. Aside from wishes, legislation is needed to raise awareness of the unnecessary demands placed on dying patients. Dr. Haselhorst is spearheading the initiative for a new law that would be juxtaposed to the Good Samaritan Law, the Caregiver’s Good Conscience Law. This legislation might provide immunity for caregivers who would act in good conscience rather than impose overzealous life support during the time to die. Empowering caregivers to stand down and elevate the dignity of those actively dying remains both a moral responsibility and quagmire. The present medico-legal paradigm supports the emotional barriers to death rather than the delivery of outright compassion.
Laws instill moral codes to society that override personal conflict. Caregivers are the moral matrix of society. The purpose of Caregivers In Sync is to standardize the prospects of providing mercy to fellow human beings during their transitions from this life. At present, we have laws that protect unborn children, but few laws that actually permit people to die much less allow for good deaths. By nature, humanitarians demonstrate good conscience and support dying with dignity as being a good death. A reasonable law needs to raise awareness and encourage caregivers collectively to be humane. Caregivers In Sync serves as a reminder that the Golden Rule applies during life and at the end of life. The Caregiver’s Good Conscience Law is a means to an end, resulting in more good deaths deliberately.

Caregiver’s Good Conscience Law

Arizona's Law

AZ CAREGIVER’S GOOD CONSCIENCE LAW: Ensures immunity for caregivers who uphold dignity for the terminally ill. Providing dignity to those dying by way of certainty, mercy and sanctity is lawful and endearing. Preventing death through artificial life support is abusive and unconscionable. Caregivers who afford dignity to others in good conscience are not to be considered negligent through the medical power of the Hippocratic Oath that implies, first do no harm. Caregivers entrusted with the life and death of a patient shall have the legal protection and ethical empowerment to enact both a good death and dying with dignity without personal and public scrutiny, condemnation or legal prosecution. Patients on the verge of dying would ideally be aware of their medical conditions and ultimate outcomes while receiving necessary palliative care. When a patients’ medical conditions worsen, caregivers are indemnified to pull out all the stops, grant human beings permission to die, provide uncompromising mercy and ease these transitions from humanity to eternity.

A Modern Version of the Hippocratic Oath
I swear to fulfill, to the best of my ability and judgment, this covenant:
I will respect the hard-won scientific gains of those physicians in whose steps I walk, and gladly share such knowledge as is mine with those who are to follow.
I will apply, for the benefit of the sick, all measures which are required, avoiding those twin traps of overtreatment and therapeutic nihilism.
I will remember that there is art to medicine as well as science, and that warmth, sympathy, and understanding may outweigh the surgeon's knife or the chemist's drug.
I will not be ashamed to say "I know not," nor will I fail to call in my colleagues when the skills of another are needed for a patient's recovery.
I will respect the privacy of my patients, for their problems are not disclosed to me that the world may know. Most especially must I tread with care in matters of life and death. If it is given me to save a life, all thanks.
But it may also be within my power to take a life; this awesome responsibility must be faced with great humbleness and awareness of my own frailty. Above all, I must not play at God.
I will remember that I do not treat a fever chart, a cancerous growth, but a sick human being, whose illness may affect the person's family and economic stability. My responsibility includes these related problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick.
I will prevent disease whenever I can, for prevention is preferable to cure.
I will remember that I remain a member of society, with special obligations to all my fellow human beings, those sound of mind and body as well as the infirm.
If I do not violate this oath, may I enjoy life and art, respected while I live and remembered with affection thereafter. May I always act so as to preserve the finest traditions of my calling and may I long experience the joy of healing those who seek my help.

#CaregiversInSync

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